When does a book become a web platform?

During last week’s CETIS conference I ran a session that assessed how ebooks can function as an educational medium beyond the paper textbook.

After reminding ourselves that etextbooks are not yet as widespread as ebook novels, and that paper books generally are still more widely read, we examined what ebook features make a good educational experience.

Though many features could have been mentioned, the majority were still about the experience itself. Top of the bill: formative assessment at the end of a chapter. Either online or offline, it needs to be interactive, and there need to be a lot of items readily available. Other notable features in the area include a desire for contextualised discussion about a text. Global is good, but chats limited to other learners in a course is better. A way of asking for clarification of a teacher by highlighting text was another notable request.

These features were then compared to what is currently the state of the art. Colin Smythe presented the latest EDUPUB work from IMS, IDPF and the W3C which integrates both VLEs and books, as well as analytics and assessment platforms. The solution is slick, and entirely web based. This contrasts with the solution I demoed before the formal EDUPUB work started. Unlike IMS’ example, my experiment does work in most any ebook software, but it doesn’t include IMS’ Caliper analytics capability.

But then Mick Chesterman of Flossmanuals and Manchester Metropolitan University reminded us that reading features aren’t the only ones worth considering. The open source Booktype platform allows communities to quickly and easily write books collaboratively, and then clone, share or merge them in a process called ‘federated publishing’.

The editability of standard, EPUB format ebooks also introduced the core question: what is the difference between an ebook and a web site? The interactivity and media support that is now possible in ebooks is blurring the distinction, but features such as the possibility of editing could prove a key distinction.

Another distinction, but one that may not persist, is a book’s persistence itself. With more functionality living outside of the book, on servers on the wider internet, how will a book endure? While intermittent connectivity means that offline access is still desirable now, will the ever increasing ubiquity of bandwidth spell the end for self-contained media?

The opening slides.

Colin Smythe’s presentation on EDUPUB.

My own presentation on embedding QTI in EPUB3.

Mick Chesterman’s slides on Booktype.

2 thoughts on “When does a book become a web platform?

  1. Pingback: Booktype & "eBooks: the learning platform of the future?" at Cetis | Clearerchannel

  2. Pingback: The future of the eBook | Getting Results -- The Questionmark Blog

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